About Apache Tracker

Apache Tracker is a resource about survival, being a Physical and Spiritual warrior, and oneness with nature or "the spirit that moves in all things." I named this site in honor of the Apache. The Apache was the ultimate, survivor, warrior, guerrilla fighter, and lived in tune with his surroundings, on a spiritual and physical level. However you will find many other topics of interest on this site. Tracking is a mind set and awareness that goes beyond the physical to all levels, including the spiritual.
-Thunderhands


"THUNDER" (wakiya)

"THUNDER" (wakiya)

About the Author

"Wakiya" (Thunder)

About the Author
Roger Thunderhands Gilbert is an accomplished writer, musician, and artist. In his lifetime, he has done many things. These would include aviation, the martial arts, and a life long study of spiritual and tribal ritual. In the martial arts, his study has included three disciplines, Aikido, Kung Fu San Soo, and Tai Chi. He also worked with the Special Forces in a training capacity. In the field of aviation, he obtained his private, commercial, and instrument ratings as a pilot, with multi-engine, and flight instructor qualifications. He learned tracking as a boy and has worked with the sheriff’s search and rescue in that capacity. His spiritual knowledge includes in-depth study, and personal experience, with many shamanistic and esoteric practices. He is a practitioner of Kriya yoga, Kundalini yoga, Tantrika, and Chinese inner alchemy. In addition, he received his certificate in acupressure and uses several modalities for healing. He considers himself an authority on the Biblical teachings of Yeshua or Jesus, but considers himself spiritual, not religious. And last but not least, he has done an exhaustive study and been an activist of North American Native tribes and ritual. His own roots are of M├ętis descent, and his spirituality is universal.

Sunday

DEBRIS HUT / How to make one



NATURAL SHELTERS
Do not overlook natural formations that provide shelter. Examples are caves, rocky crevices, clumps of bushes, small depressions, large rocks on leeward sides of hills, large trees with low-hanging limbs, and fallen trees with thick branches. However, when selecting a natural formation—

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Stay away from low ground such as ravines, narrow valleys, or creek beds. Low areas collect the heavy cold air at night and are therefore colder than the surrounding high ground. Thick, brushy, low ground also harbors more insects.
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Check for poisonous snakes, ticks, mites, scorpions, and stinging ants.
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Look for loose rocks, dead limbs, coconuts, or other natural growth than could fall on your shelter.

For warmth and ease of construction, the debris hut is one of the best. When shelter is essential to survival, build this shelter



To make a debris hut, you should—

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Build it by making a tripod with two short stakes and a long ridgepole or by placing one end of a long ridgepole on top of a sturdy base.
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Secure the ridgepole (pole running the length of the shelter) using the tripod method or by anchoring it to a tree at about waist height.
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Prop large sticks along both sides of the ridgepole to create a wedge-shaped ribbing effect. Ensure the ribbing is wide enough to accommodate your body and steep enough to shed moisture.
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Place finer sticks and brush crosswise on the ribbing. These form a latticework that will keep the insulating material (grass, pine needles, leaves) from falling through the ribbing into the sleeping area.
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Add light, dry, if possible, soft debris over the ribbing until the insulating material is at least 1 meter (3 feet) thick—the thicker the better.

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Place a 30-centimeter (1-foot) layer of insulating material inside the shelter.
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At the entrance, pile insulating material that you can drag to you once inside the shelter to close the entrance or build a door.
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As a final step in constructing this shelter, add shingling material or branches on top of the debris layer to prevent the insulating material from blowing away in a storm.

Comment: Debris huts have been known to save people in 20 to 40 below weather.
When built properly some people even complain of being to hot. Make sure you stuff debris or leaves all around inside the shelter.
-Wakiya

2 comments:

  1. Wakiya, I have read this carefully and feel as though I could do this well... in fact it would make a nice dwelling with no indoor plumbing. Thank You for the information.

    ReplyDelete
  2. i think thats so kool no indor plumming for me!!!

    ReplyDelete