About Apache Tracker

Apache Tracker is a resource about survival, being a Physical and Spiritual warrior, and oneness with nature or "the spirit that moves in all things." I named this site in honor of the Apache. The Apache was the ultimate, survivor, warrior, guerrilla fighter, and lived in tune with his surroundings, on a spiritual and physical level. However you will find many other topics of interest on this site. Tracking is a mind set and awareness that goes beyond the physical to all levels, including the spiritual.
-Thunderhands


"THUNDER" (wakiya)

"THUNDER" (wakiya)

About the Author

"Wakiya" (Thunder)

About the Author
Roger Thunderhands Gilbert is an accomplished writer, musician, and artist. In his lifetime, he has done many things. These would include aviation, the martial arts, and a life long study of spiritual and tribal ritual. In the martial arts, his study has included three disciplines, Aikido, Kung Fu San Soo, and Tai Chi. He also worked with the Special Forces in a training capacity. In the field of aviation, he obtained his private, commercial, and instrument ratings as a pilot, with multi-engine, and flight instructor qualifications. He learned tracking as a boy and has worked with the sheriff’s search and rescue in that capacity. His spiritual knowledge includes in-depth study, and personal experience, with many shamanistic and esoteric practices. He is a practitioner of Kriya yoga, Kundalini yoga, Tantrika, and Chinese inner alchemy. In addition, he received his certificate in acupressure and uses several modalities for healing. He considers himself an authority on the Biblical teachings of Yeshua or Jesus, but considers himself spiritual, not religious. And last but not least, he has done an exhaustive study and been an activist of North American Native tribes and ritual. His own roots are of M├ętis descent, and his spirituality is universal.

Wednesday

The Apache Knife: A Way of Life

Yes, an Apache always has a lot of different blades on him for multiple uses. He'll holster them in different places and deploys them at different times. In close-range fighting, Apaches preferred the knife over any other weapon. Warriors and women alike always carried a knife, whether they used it around the camp, or for combat. In using the lance, war club, knife or empty-hands, the Apache warrior was extremely aggressive, but never to the point of recklessness. The Apache strategy in battle centered on overrunning and completely overwhelming the enemy. This tactic worked well (before firearms), as the Apaches were generally outnumbered. One warrior would most likely face several opponents. If the odds were too great, or if a chance for the entire war party to escape unharmed presented itself, warriors would gladly retire. For life was, and still is, quite dear to the Apaches. The legendary skills and endurance of the Apache warriors have been documented through the testimonies of the soldiers who fought them. They even referred to them as the ‘tigers of the human race’ as they were deemed most ideally adapted to fighting in their rugged homeland. Warriors wore a shirt, breech cloth, and moccasins normally reaching above the knee; they carried a rope, blanket, water jar, fire stick, rations of mescal or jerky, and their weapons. The Apache might employ a shield, bow, arrows, lance, club, Knife, and during the Apache Wars, a gun and cartridge belt. They also blackened their weapons to camouflage them.

The Apache attitude toward pain was altogether different from that of the Mexicans and Americans. Pain was a fact of life and to endure it stoically and silently was the sign of good character. From early on, boys were taught how to endure pain. The Apaches, in contrast to the Plains Indians, applauded courage but derided heroics; their numbers were too few for flamboyant risks and needless loss of life. Stealth and caution were encouraged. However, when the Apache was wounded or cornered, there was no more ferocious adversary.

2 comments:

  1. Congratulations on that very interesting website! I have been interested in Chiricahua and Western Apache culture and history for years, so I always enjoy to find out about other people interested in culture and history of the fascinating Apache people. May I ask you to send me the original (whole) photograph from this article at my e-mail (m.kriech@bluemail.ch)? That would be awesome. Thanks and keep up the great work! =) Marco

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  2. Hi, this is a great article, I really enjoyed reading it! =) May I ask you to send me the Apache image (the whole photograph) at my e-mail (m.kriech@bluemail.ch)? Thanks and keep up the great work! Kind regards, Marco

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